http://yaseriesinsiders.com/post/72014373421/heres-another-awesome-giveaway-from-adventures-in

yaseriesinsiders:

Here’s another awesome giveaway from Adventures in YA Publishing and Simon Pulse, the publisher of both YASI members Martina Boone and S.E. Green. This is the last of three great giveaways to celebrate the end of a great year and the start of a new one.

If you missed the previous two, be sure to…

librarEan: Yo, tumblarians! Help a lady out?

smuttyscissors:

So:

  • I have been working part-time in circulation since November 2012
  • I will be starting my MLS (if all goes well) in September at the earliest; January at the latest.
  • In the meantime, I’m going to be looking for promotions I’m qualified for until I finish this degree.

As far as burning out, keep in mind that you’ll be living and breathing libraries. As in, you’re really going to care about your classes and your coworkers are going to be supportive beyond belief. It makes it easier to get through, I promise. As you probably know by now, librarians are good people.

As for credits at a time, my advice is to base it on whatever work you can get. Do as much library working as you possibly can, and base your course load around that. Personally, I worked part time and took classes full time for my first 2 semesters; then when I managed to get 2 part time jobs that added up to a 42 hour work week, I went to school part time, because that’s what I could handle. Look into your program’s summer semester - not everything will be offered, it’s shorter, and you lose your break, but it’s also often cheaper and will help knock those classes down and get you where you’re going faster.

Good luck!

getoutoftherecat:

get off me cat. you can’t have The Fault in our Stars. you can’t read. and you don’t know how to be awesome.

getoutoftherecat:

get off me cat. you can’t have The Fault in our Stars. you can’t read. and you don’t know how to be awesome.

World War Z by Max Brooks

It’s entirely possible that I started listening to this not because of the upcoming Brad Pitt movie, but because Alan Alda reads a small section of it.

Read more
Th1rteen R3asons Why by Jay Asher
Plot: Clay gets a box of tapes in the mail, and when he plays them, discovers he is one of the recipients of Hannah’s suicide note, a series of stories she recorded and sent to the 13 people who caused her death.
1) Hey, wanna do something awful to yourself? I recommend getting this as an audiobook and listening to it through the tapedeck in your ancient car, via an iPod-cassette adapter. This is an amazingly acted audiobook,  and that is a positively heartbreaking way to experience it.
2) Remember Maureen Johnson’s coverflip project? This isn’t exactly what she was talking about, since it was written by a male author, but this is definitely a book that got the girl-book treatment. Look at that cover - wistful teen girl staring into space on a swing. That’s not the cover of a boy-book. Which is a real shame, because what this story is is Rape Culture for Teens 101. It’s narrated by a teen boy, with his horror as he listens to the escalating story of how the people in Hannah’s life created and perpetuated an unsafe environment she couldn’t live in. It’s horrifying to listen to, and I think that the strength of this book as a social commentary is that it’s very much about all the little things, and the fact that they aren’t isolated incidents in Hannah’s life - they’re all related to each other, and they add up.

Th1rteen R3asons Why by Jay Asher

Plot: Clay gets a box of tapes in the mail, and when he plays them, discovers he is one of the recipients of Hannah’s suicide note, a series of stories she recorded and sent to the 13 people who caused her death.

1) Hey, wanna do something awful to yourself? I recommend getting this as an audiobook and listening to it through the tapedeck in your ancient car, via an iPod-cassette adapter. This is an amazingly acted audiobook,  and that is a positively heartbreaking way to experience it.

2) Remember Maureen Johnson’s coverflip project? This isn’t exactly what she was talking about, since it was written by a male author, but this is definitely a book that got the girl-book treatment. Look at that cover - wistful teen girl staring into space on a swing. That’s not the cover of a boy-book. Which is a real shame, because what this story is is Rape Culture for Teens 101. It’s narrated by a teen boy, with his horror as he listens to the escalating story of how the people in Hannah’s life created and perpetuated an unsafe environment she couldn’t live in. It’s horrifying to listen to, and I think that the strength of this book as a social commentary is that it’s very much about all the little things, and the fact that they aren’t isolated incidents in Hannah’s life - they’re all related to each other, and they add up.

Graffiti Moon by Cath Crowley
Plot: It’s the last night of senior year, and Lucy wants to find and meet the mysterious graffiti artist Shadow. Ed and Leo, the secret identities of graffiti team Shadow and Poet, take Lucy and her friends on an adventure to find the elusive artist.
Really lovely, and a nice portrayal of a character with a learning disability. I recently complained that one thing I didn’t like about Why We Broke Up was that the fake films Min describes don’t really give a lot of insight into her character, because they’re a fictional frame of reference so we don’t have full context and they aren’t described in a way that told me what they meant to her. In this story, which relies heavily on art and poetry, the art is handled really well, despite being described and not seen. The artwork is explicitly about the characters’ emotions and worldviews, and the descriptions focus more on the characters and their interpretations than the images themselves, and Leo’s poetry is offered up in full. 
It’s also one of the better uses of multiple perspectives, which seems to be a big trend right now, since it focuses a lot on perceptions. That was something else that bothered me about Why We Broke Up - I spent the whole book wanting to know what Ed thought, even before I knew the ending. This book was definitely more what I like - even though I know part of the point of WWBU was that it was biased and completely about Min, I’d rather see the big picture, which Graffiti Moon does without losing focus on each character’s thoughts, emotions, and worries.

Graffiti Moon by Cath Crowley

Plot: It’s the last night of senior year, and Lucy wants to find and meet the mysterious graffiti artist Shadow. Ed and Leo, the secret identities of graffiti team Shadow and Poet, take Lucy and her friends on an adventure to find the elusive artist.

Really lovely, and a nice portrayal of a character with a learning disability. I recently complained that one thing I didn’t like about Why We Broke Up was that the fake films Min describes don’t really give a lot of insight into her character, because they’re a fictional frame of reference so we don’t have full context and they aren’t described in a way that told me what they meant to her. In this story, which relies heavily on art and poetry, the art is handled really well, despite being described and not seen. The artwork is explicitly about the characters’ emotions and worldviews, and the descriptions focus more on the characters and their interpretations than the images themselves, and Leo’s poetry is offered up in full.

It’s also one of the better uses of multiple perspectives, which seems to be a big trend right now, since it focuses a lot on perceptions. That was something else that bothered me about Why We Broke Up - I spent the whole book wanting to know what Ed thought, even before I knew the ending. This book was definitely more what I like - even though I know part of the point of WWBU was that it was biased and completely about Min, I’d rather see the big picture, which Graffiti Moon does without losing focus on each character’s thoughts, emotions, and worries.


Myles: “You didn’t kill him. He would have killed you, but you didn’t kill him.” 
Alanna: “So? He was stupid. If I killed everyone who was stupid, I wouldn’t have time to sleep.”


Defining series of my own young adult years.

Myles: “You didn’t kill him. He would have killed you, but you didn’t kill him.” 

Alanna: “So? He was stupid. If I killed everyone who was stupid, I wouldn’t have time to sleep.”

Defining series of my own young adult years.

(Source: shallandavar)

olplya:

Happy Memorial Day Weekend!SUMMER READING STARTS SOON!!!Pick up your reading logs from the Help Desk starting June 3rd. So much going on. 
Just look at the poster. It looks like someone said, “Let’s just throw all the things on it”.  And then their boss said, “As long as there’s a flying submarine, I’m cool with it”.
Beneath the Surface! Summer Reading! Whooooooooo!

The first meeting of my internship working on a teen srp included about 10 minutes on my supervisor’s feelings about this poster.

olplya:

Happy Memorial Day Weekend!

SUMMER READING STARTS SOON!!!

Pick up your reading logs from the Help Desk starting June 3rd. So much going on. 

Just look at the poster. It looks like someone said, “Let’s just throw all the things on it”.  And then their boss said, “As long as there’s a flying submarine, I’m cool with it”.

Beneath the Surface! Summer Reading! Whooooooooo!

The first meeting of my internship working on a teen srp included about 10 minutes on my supervisor’s feelings about this poster.

laura-in-libraryland reblogged your post: Overheard in the library: Yeah, well, I dont…

Was it a librarian?

No, it was one of our students. And I think she caught me trying not to laugh. Little does she know, this half of her school library staff spends her free time looking at cat blogs.